NYC Landmarks Brouhaha Spotlights Forgotten Sites

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IN A MOVE THAT COMES AS A GREAT RELIEF to those who care about New York City’s historic architecture, the Landmarks Preservation Commission has reversed its recent decision to drop nearly 100 properties from its calendar, where many had languished for five years or more. It’s an administrative maneuver that doesn’t necessarily save anything, but at least insures that these properties — all of which were in the initial stages of being designated as landmarks, with research, public hearings, and a vote to follow — will remain under the oversight of the LPC and can’t be willy-nilly altered or, God forbid, demolished.

Top: c.1880 Second Empire cottage, Snug Harbor, Staten Island

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Mid-19th c. Ploughman’s Bush Building, North Bronx

Local preservation groups, including including Landmark West and the Historic Districts Council, went ballistic when the decision to remove the properties from LPC oversight was announced just after Thanksgiving. The outcry succeeded in getting the LPC to keep these 100 or so properties on the calendar.

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St. Barbara’s Church, 1910, Spanish Baroque, Bushwick, Brooklyn

For me, the eye-opener was an email from the New York Landmarks Conservancy, showing a number of fine and important buildings throughout the five boroughs that I had no idea were quite unprotected. The images in this post come from that email.

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Curtis House, c. 1850 Romantic Revival cottage, Staten Island

Better-known and much-beloved sites that remain in this netherworld — for the reversal of the ‘de-calendaring’ was merely a postponement — include Brooklyn’s Greenwood Cemetery and the neon Pepsi sign in Long Island City.

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Left to right, above: 2 Oliver Street, 1821 Federal style townhouse, Chinatown; 138 Second Avenue,1832 Federal style rowhouse, East Village; 57 Sullivan Street, 1816 Federal style townhouse, SoHo

For New York Times coverage of the LPC’s original plan to chop the list of proposed landmarks, go here; and to read about the reversal of the decision, here. 

About cara

I blog for fun here at casaCARA, and write about architecture, interiors, gardens and travel for many national magazines and websites. My recently published posts and articles can be found here: https://casacara.wordpress.com/recent-articles/
This entry was posted in ARCHITECTURE, BROOKLYN, HISTORIC PRESERVATION, MANHATTAN and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to NYC Landmarks Brouhaha Spotlights Forgotten Sites

  1. Barbara Peck says:

    These are all lovely buildings! Especially St. Barbara’s in Bushwick; who knew?

  2. Chris Kraig says:

    Great News! I live on Staten Island where the wholesale destruction of important or simply beautiful structures by insensitive remodeling,intentional neglect or greed has blighted the borough. After just having a conversation with the Staten Island Preservation League president, John Kilcullen, regarding this unsettling decision I could not be happier to hear this good news!
    Thanks Cara!!!!

  3. cara says:

    Hi Chris, thanks for weighing in. I didn’t know there was a Staten Island preservation league, but I’m glad to hear it. It’s a vast borough with a long history and the potential for a lot of development. Staten Islanders have to remain vigilant in years to come.

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