IMG_0269

LANZAROTE IS A VOLCANIC ISLAND, which many are, but what’s different about it — as opposed to, say, lush Kauai — is that the last major eruption occurred relatively recently. In September of 1730, Mt. Timanfaya let loose a lava flow that decimated two-thirds of the island. Where efforts to re-forest (or re-palm, or re-cactus) have been made, they’ve been successful. But despite the sunny clime (it’s 72 here today, she said smugly), the southern part of the island  — all I’ve seen so far — is a blackened landscape, not without its own charred beauty.

IMG_0231

The lava, long since solidified, that destroyed a dozen villages and sent islanders fleeing to other parts of the Canary Islands archipelago has been put to good use. You see it in agriculture, in building construction, and in countless decorative applications. I mean, it’s everywhere. See below for some of the practical and imaginative ways the people of Lanzarote have re-purposed the black stuff.

As boulders around swimming pools…

IMG_0186

Hotel Gran Melia Salinas, Costa Teguise

Exterior walls…

IMG_0196

Fundacion Cesar Manrique

Interior walls…

IMG_0206

IMG_0208

Fundacion Cesar Manrique

Mosaic murals…

IMG_0215

Fundacion Cesar Manrique

Boundary walls…

IMG_0216

Fundacion Cesar Manrique

Mulch…

IMG_0221

Fundacion Cesar Manrique

Steps…

IMG_0227

Monumento al Campesino

IMG_0228

Museo del Campesino

IMG_0273

Castillo de San Jose

Terraced farming (each shrub, vine or fruit tree has it’s own surround for protection from winds)…

IMG_0244

Building construction, often covered with stucco…

IMG_0234

Caseria de Mozaga, an inn and restaurant

Crazy paving…

IMG_0246

Hotel Finca de la Florida

18th century castle walls…

IMG_0260

Castillo de San Jose

Arched interior rooms… floors too…

IMG_0263

Castillo de San Jose (now a contemporary art museum)

IMG_0261

Castillo de San Jose

About these ads